Posts tagged ‘ASK SAGE’

April 3rd, 2018

What happened to my job applications?

by AskSage

Sage,

As a former CFO, I’ve sent out 6,000+ job applications over 2 years w/o much success. They simply thanked me for submitting my resume and few invited me to an interview (albeit, none offered a job).

Where are my job applications? Are they being read?

Best, Ken

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Ken,

First of all, I’m very sorry for your experience, which unfortunately has become the new norm for most of us. On average, recruiters today receive more than 3,000 job applications for every advertised senior-level-executive position. No-one can sort through this onslaught of data. Most recruiters are ‘boiling them down’ via electronic key word search, so they end up with some 30 (0.01% of all submitted) résumés.

They then read the first paragraphs of each to find out if the summary of qualifications meets what the client company is looking for. Typically they are not interested in interviewing more than 15 or so via telephone (0.005%) and it’s only those who normally get some sort of notification. The rest goes into/stays in one big database…

The issue is obvious: Too many (qualified) candidates and not enough positions. The solution is to have a ‘Plan B’ to corporate (un-) employment.

 
Sage

 

May 13th, 2011

What Can I Tell My Wife?

by AskSage

Hi Sage,

My wife doesn’t understand why I haven’t gotten a job yet. It never took this long in the past. What can I tell her? As you might imagine, I’m really struggling with this one. Looking forward to your response.

Best, Chris


Dear Chris,

I/ we get this question quite often. Most times even the executives themselves don’t know why their job search is taking so long and believe there is something wrong with them, that they might no longer “have what it takes”. This is not what I/we have been seeing when speaking to many tens of thousands of our peers since this company was started almost a decade ago.

Here is the simple (& hard) truth you may share with your better half:

  • Since year 2000  job search times for execs have skyrocketed –to about 23 months at the present  while
  • average tenures  have decreased to about 18 months and
  • age  discrimination starts now at about 42 years of age (versus early to mid  fifties a decade or so ago).
  • Millions of  American jobs were outsourced permanently to countries like China,  India, Mexico etc. -and the executive positions with it.
  • The new jobs  that are being created are non-executive/ often low wage jobs
  • un-and underemployment amongst  senior-level-execs is around 40+% nationwide.
  • For every advertised VP and C-level job  opening companies & recruiters see now many thousands of applications  –versus maybe one hundred or so some 10 years ago.
  • A typical executive today (calculating a  median base salary of $150K+ and the above mentioned job search times and  tenures) makes less money than many truck drivers do in this country.
  • Waiting for that job interview that might or  might not come is simply no longer a smart way of allocating ones resources  (considering the money you burn through during your search with nothing to  show for it).
  • Pursuing alternatives to employment (with or  without our help) and being (again) in charge of your own destiny and earnings  power is incomparably smarter, Chris.


Sincerely, Sage

 

March 31st, 2011

Where do I go from here?

by AskSage

Hi Sage,

Many of my former colleagues and I (all Senior Executives and laid off during the “Great Recession”), cannot secure employment at the career/salary-level we have enjoyed for decades  and have the same question/concern:

Where do I/we go from here? Most of us have kids in high school/college, mortgages to pay etc. and are VERY qualified but cannot find a job –while our savings and 401Ks are literally disappearing in front of our eyes.  What do you suggest I/we do?

Best Regards, David

 

Dear David,

What you are describing in your Email has become the new norm for today’s Executives. A survey conducted by Netshare.com shows that 42% of our peer group is un- or underemployed –nationwide. Our own experience indicates an even higher number than that.

Many become ‘consultants’ -but are without projects or clients- while actively seeking full-time employment. They are flying and dying under the radar -and are not accounted for by the Labor Department.

When you add to this a current average executive job search time of 23 months, an average tenure of 18 months –and do the math- you’ll find that today’s average VP or C-level Executive makes no more annualized income than a full time truck driver. Add to this rampant age discrimination and you get the picture. It just doesn’t make sense.

Becoming an independent business owner, partner in an existing business, buying into a franchise etc. has become a much more viable strategy for senior-level executives.

You can find many credible six-figure-income opportunities with a good historical track record, that start as low as $12K and can go as high as you wish -or can afford.

David, you and your former colleagues DO have options. They are simply different from what you were used to in the past. You may want to reach out to your Personal Business Advisor or write to [info @ personalbusinessadvisors.com]

 

Sincerely, Sage

March 31st, 2011

Is Age a Factor For Not Finding a Job?

by AskSage

Sage,

I’d like your opinion on age discrimination. After eight different job interviews and no offers whatsoever, I wonder if my age is the reason for that. I have never had this kind of experience before during my 27-year career.

I’m a 52-year-old VP of Operations with a successful track record in public and privately held logistics companies.

Best, Gary

 

Dear Gary,

The old saying “If you feel it is true, it probably is” applies –unfortunately- here as well.

Even though age discrimination is illegal in this country, the reality is different -especially for senior-level-executives. When executive recruiters get retained or contingency searches, they hear all too often “don’t bring me anybody with more than 15 years of experience”. In other words, don’t bring me anybody older than forty.

One might argue that this is shortsighted (from a company’s point of view), but as long as quarterly (and annual results) are the only measurements we use to judge a companies’ performance, that won’t change any time soon.

So yes, if you are a senior-level-executive and have reached the tender age of 40+, you will start experiencing some (a lot of?) age discrimination.

Gary, you DO have options. You may want to reach out to your Personal Business Advisor or  write to info@personalbusinessadvisors.com

 

Sincerely, Sage